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Tips for making your video go viral

By on Nov 25, 2014 in Marketing |

It’s not every day that you showcase the worst dancing skills in the world and end up becoming a star. In case you didn’t guess yet the protagonists here are Psy and his forgettable yet enjoyable Gagnam style. That’s what viral videos do to you, it has the power to make someone a star over the night and make the same star bite the dust the very next day. And one of the most puzzling things for the current human species would be: How can we make a viral video? Well, viral videos can be as simple as the domino effect but being the one to initiate the fall isn’t a cake walk. It might look like an accident, but trust me it isn’t. There are certain things that need to be done to keep your chances of going viral intact so, if there is some book around the table, keep it aside because bookmarking the page would do swell. Size does matter Size might not matter elsewhere, but when it comes to viral videos, it really matters. No one is going to sit and watch a ten minute video and then share it with everyone unless it is the leaked footage of some big budget film. Since our video is not that big, the best thing to do will be to keep it short and sweet, so someone doesn’t have to spend a lot of time to get awed by the video. Spare the weekends, attack the bore days If you have the idea that releasing a video on weekend would work out like a miracle, immediately scratch that because it doesn’t. It’s not in the weekend that people watch videos and read news, it’s during their work, yes, and you heard me right, DURING THEIR WORK. A majority of the people wants to spend their weekend relaxing while the pain of going over news feed comes around during the week days. So, Monday and Tuesday, which are the epitome of boredom, would be ideal days to get your video online. Promote, promote and promote If you just upload your video and just sit idle in your couch eating some chips, the video is not going to be viral. There is a hell lot of promotion that needs to be done for that and it’s you who have to get the job done. Share it everywhere without making it look like a spam and the more you share, the more attention you get and that’s best for business.  Tell a story Even if you don’t keep up with the last three points, this one needs to be met at any cost. If you make a one-minute video without no story, you are not going to get any shares. The whole idea of sharing is to tell stories to each other and if you don’t have a story to tell, the viewers wouldn’t be interested in coming back and giving the video another look. You might not be able to tell a story like Christopher Nolan or Martin Scorsese, but deliver the goods when it is needed the most no matter how bad it is. Author Bio: The author is a Social Media Marketer and a freelancer in...

Video Marketing With YouTube

By on Feb 10, 2014 in Marketing |

You may have heard of YouTube and how it can help you in your business endeavors. Read on and find out how and why. This article discusses YouTube and how it can help you market your business through the internet. The recent purchase of YouTube by Google was big news. Yet, people seem not to be surprised by Google’s move. After all, YouTube is a very promising video blogging site that is inviting more and more viewers by the minute. In the following years, YouTube definitely promises to attract more and more people and thereby become even more attractive to internet marketers and online businessmen. You may know by now that YouTube is not only for personal, casual and out-of-this-world videos anymore. The business industry has found a new business partner in the internet and specifically in online video blogging. Do you want to get the word out about your business online? Here’s how you can do it through YouTube and other video blogging sites like it. Getting Into the Tube 1 Prepare you business plan and identify your target market. In your business plan, you must set out your objectives or what you wish to accomplish through YouTube. You may set a particular number of people becoming your subscribers in a day as your internet marketing objective. It can also be the number of people following the link to your home page and becoming your customers. It can also take the form of the number of people who reposts your video in their own blogs. It is important to set out a plan (objectives and the way to achieve them) so you will always be clear on what constitutes internet marketing success and how you can attain this success. It is also important to identify your target market before launching an internet marketing campaign so you can be sure that YouTube is the site for you. YouTube has been mostly for teenagers and the younger set, but this is rapidly changing and young professionals and middle-age people have now found their way to YouTube. If your products or services have a wide market base, then you can definitely use YouTube. 2. Accustom yourself with video making. It is important that you know the technology behind video blogging so you can make videos that will stand out among the millions of videos in YouTube’s repository. 3. Make your video. Keep it short and do not forget to indicate that it is a short video on your business product once you upload it. Remember to specifically indicate your product’s value to your target market. Have a catchy slogan at the end of your video, if possible. Don’t forget to aid your audio narration with a few subtitles to make your business goals clear and understandable to anyone who watches your video. Make it more interesting with a soundtrack that is relevant to your marketing message and that has universal appeal. 4. Upload it on YouTube and wait for results. As much as possible make the online audience aware of your video. Send notifications through e-mails, newsletters, online blogs, groups, social networks and more. Remember that it is still up to you yourself to make your video’s presence known on the internet. What YouTube has to offer is the possibility and opportunity for others to view your video and become aware of your business. So stop stalling and start video blogging at...

Marketing Is Not Everybody’s Cup of Tea

By on Jan 26, 2014 in Marketing |

Most coaches get involved in coaching for one extremely compelling and valuable purpose – because they want to make a positive impact to the lives of others. As a coach, the extent to which you are able to fulfill that objective is contingent upon two factors. Firstly, your skill and effectiveness as a coach; and secondly, on the number of clients you are able to affect through the application of your services. The purpose of this article is to focus on the second factor. In the process of assisting people, it’s also possible for coaches to develop a fruitful lifestyle for themselves along the way. In fact, these objectives are entirely complimentary. Many business people, including coaches, fail to recognize the important ethical role that marketing plays in their business. In doing so they develop a mindset that is self-defeating to themselves, their business, and their clients. As a coach, you are in business. How effectively you operate your business is entirely contingent on you. There are enormously successful coaches (in terms of client numbers, income and coaching outcomes), and coaches that are barely able to etch out a living. The difference between these extremes is not their coaching competency, but rather their mindset. You may be an incredibly skilful coach, but unless you have people willing to use your services, your skills are of little to no value. So what mindset does it take to be a successful coach? A successful coaching mindset: – Puts the needs of prospects and clients first; – Actively seeks to assist clients attain their objectives; – Is empathetic to the needs of clients and prospects; – Doesn’t limit the service offered to clients, and – Acts as an ethical adviser. It takes a Marketing Mindset to be a successful coach. We regularly hear of coaches that feel as though marketing is ‘leading’ and ‘unethical.’ They feel as though it’s too ‘salesy’ and don’t feel comfortable with it. For those coaches, we’re going to explain why marketing is both ethically valid and commercially crucial. Ethical Validity There is an enormous (and growing) volume of people in society that would benefit from coaching services. Let’s call these people prospective coaching clients, or prospects. These prospects have specific goals they’d like to achieve, or challenges they’d like to overcome, with a view to leading a better and more fulfilling life. As a coach you have a certain duty of care to assist these people. You can only begin to assist them once they’re utilizing your services. Marketing is the link between the prospects desire and your ability to assist them fulfill their desire. Marketing only becomes unethical in the circumstance that you are not able to fulfill your marketing promise to your client. In this instance you’ve misled your client, either knowingly or unknowingly, and have acted unethically. On the premise that prospects will seek a coach to assist them attain their specific goals; it’s the ethical obligation of coaches to help prospects select a coach that will best be able to assist them. To do this coaches should fully, comprehensively and transparently disclose to prospects what services they offer; where their specialties lie; what experience they have; how they’ve assisted people with similar desires in the past; and how using their services will benefit them. Or to state it more simply, to undertake marketing. Commercially Crucial Marketing is commercially crucial because it links prospects that desire a certain outcome with skilled professionals trained to assist them achieve that outcome. It identifies you as someone that may be able to assist prospects with their pre-qualified needs. By seeking out information on coaching services, prospects have already identified for themselves: 1. That there are certain things in their life they’d like to attain or challenges they’d like to overcome. 2. That a coach is a person with the requisite skills and experience to assist them. 3. That they are willing to invest financially in the process. The above is an extremely important point, and one that coaches need to accept. As we explained earlier, coaches generally come from one of two schools of thought with respect to marketing. The first school of thought perceives marketing to be ‘leading’ and ‘salesy.’ They come from the paradigm that by marketing you are proactively influencing someone in their decisions. Or specifically that you may make someone do something they would not otherwise do. We call this train of thought the Influencing Paradigm. The second school of thought accepts that prospects are people that have identified for themselves their need to invoke change. And they’ve identified that a coach will assist them make that change. They recognize that the prospect has made the intellectual link between their needs and how they want those needs to be fulfilled. We call this train of thought the Service Paradigm. The thought processes of these two perspectives are entirely dipolar. One positions the prospect as someone reluctantly influenced into utilizing a service, and the other positions the prospect as a proactive individual capable of determining their needs that has actively sought out coaching services. As a coach, it’s critical that you put yourself in the second paradigm of thinking. Only then will you be able to ethically fulfill your objective of assisting your clients. And only then will you be able to fulfill your symbiotic goal of building a successful coaching business. By putting...

Marketing Ebooks and Using Ebooks for Marketing

By on Jan 14, 2014 in Marketing |

The Internet is connecting advertisers and marketers to customers from Boston to Bali. If you’re thinking about advertising on the Internet, remember that many of the same rules that apply to other forms of advertising apply to electronic marketing. The Federal Trade Commission Act allows the FTC to act in the interest of all consumers to prevent deceptive and unfair acts or practices. The FTC has determined that a representation, omission or practice is deceptive if it is likely to: 1. Mislead consumers and 2. Affect consumers’ behavior or decisions about the product or service. In addition, an act or practice is unfair if the injury it causes is: 1. Substantial 2. Not outweighed by other benefits and 3. Not reasonably avoidable. The FTC prohibits unfair or deceptive advertising in any medium. That is, advertising must tell the truth and not mislead consumers. A claim can be misleading if relevant information is left out or if the claim implies something that’s not true. For example, a lease advertisement for an automobile that promotes “$0 Down” may be misleading if significant and undisclosed charges are due at lease signing. In addition, claims must be substantiated, especially when they concern health, safety, or performance. The type of evidence may depend on the product, the claims, and what experts believe necessary. If your ad specifies a certain level of support for a claim – “tests show X” – you must have at least that level of support. Other points to consider: Disclaimers and disclosures must be clear and conspicuous. That is, consumers must be able to notice, read or hear, and understand the information. Still, a disclaimer or disclosure alone usually is not enough to remedy a false or deceptive claim. Testimonials and endorsements must reflect the typical experiences of consumers, unless the ad clearly and conspicuously states otherwise (by mario sauro). A statement that not all consumers will get the same results is not enough to qualify a claim. Testimonials and endorsements can’t be used to make a claim that the advertiser itself cannot substantiate. If your ad uses phrases like “satisfaction guaranteed” or “money-back guarantee,” you must be willing to give full refunds for any reason. You also must tell the consumer the terms of the...

Business to Business Marketing Is a Different Animal

By on Aug 14, 2013 in Marketing |

Marketing to other marketers to make it easier to make money is great but many of the buyers never use the products and just try to pawn them off on other marketers. So you wind up with all these people selling scripts, programs, eBooks, and more to other online marketers and they profess how great they are without ever using them. They are just trying to make a buck as an affiliate of someone else’s idea. I am all for new marketing ideas especially the ones that automate tedious tasks. I love submitting articles and use an auto submitter. RSS feeds provide news to my sites. Automatically creating links to Clickbank items based on keywords in my blogs is a godsend. But, to me, if people don’t use these products and just pimp them to others, they are missing out on the long term benefits for a quick buck. I admit that I have done this in the past and may do it again in the future – but – I only sell products that I actually use and approve. That way I can actually vouch for them since I have used them and can speak from personal experience. Personally, I prefer to market to the average Internet Joe. I market to people who are looking for a deal on a credit card (and I use a super script to keep my site current). I recommend hotels in Thailand and can speak from first-hand experience (by mario sauro). I post links to hotels in Thailand forums and also have 6 Thai affiliate hotel sites. I also write articles about Thailand and list my hotel affiliate links in the author’s resource box. These are pretty easy to write since I have been traveling to Thailand for over 30 years. I also write the occasional marketing or credit article to get some traffic to those sites. I have about 10 article sites and advertise on those sites that others submit their articles to. I would rather make a few bucks marketing a product to people who are actually going to use it instead of marketing to someone who is only going to try to sell it to someone else. All of this is just my personal opinion. There is nothing morally wrong or illegal of marketing to marketers. I use many of the items that are up for sale, especially those that make my life a little bit easier. The one thing that I do object to is the folks that market to others and make false or misleading statements indicating that they use the product and how wonderful it is when they have never used it and just want to make a buck. Anyhow, keep coming up with all those great products that marketers can use to make our lives easier. Just market them...

Cloud Infrastructure And Services EMC Certification Exams

By on Aug 14, 2013 in Marketing, Online Marketing |

Cloud computing is the way of the future and of the present, so if you want to get a job in the IT world, the right cloud computing credentials could be your way in. The EMC E20-002 Cloud Infrastructure And Services Exam is an excellent option when you are seeking cloud computing credentials. Take a closer look at what this exam covers to see if it might be the right certification for your career goals. What Topics Will Be Covered On The EMC E20-002 Exam? The main topics that you can expect to see reflected in the questions on this exam are cloud primer, journey to the cloud, classic data center, virtualized data center, and cloud management and services. Each one of these main topics has several subtopics included within it to give you more direction, but the main topics give you a pretty good idea of what you can expect the questions on this exam to be like. Study Methods For EMC Certification Exams There are many routes you can take to prepare for EMC Certification Exams, and it is advised that you draw from more than one source. For example, EMC provides practice tests, so you would be smart to take advantage of these tools. You can also find comprehensive exam review materials at TestsForge to ensure that you review all the information that you might find on the exam. Exams such as this one are no cake walk, so you need to put in some serious effort if you want to walk away with a certification. You’ll be glad that you...